BOOK PREVIEW, PART I THE ROAD QUEEN AND I

© By Ann Ferrar

All content (text and photos) on this website Copyright © 1990 - 2018, Ann Ferrar. Ann Ferrar is the primary source and sole rights-holder of this material in its entirety, and she reserves all rights to her work. These original stories from the author's forthcoming book "African American Queen of the Road—Bessie Stringfield and Me, A Memoir of Race, Friendship, Resilience and the Road," and the exclusive oral history of Bessie Stringfield recorded by Ann Ferrar, are registered with the Library of Congress and are protected by U.S. and International Copyright Laws. This content and its other, earlier versions may not be pirated, adapted to other media, duplicated, stored or otherwise plagiarized, in whole or in part, by other parties in any media. The author's various, original stories on Bessie Stringfield appear here and have been published in her book "Hear Me Roar" (1996; 2000); on the American Motorcycle Hall of Fame website (2002; 2018); in periodicals (1993-2003); and on the author's former website AnnFerrar.com (2007-2018). The author's intellectual property includes (but is not limited to) her narrative prose, storylines, chronicles, perspectives, opinions and conclusions on the life of Bessie Stringfield, as well as dialogue and quotes from Bessie Stringfield as told to Ann Ferrar. For user-friendly details on intellectual property, copyright guidelines and reaching out to the author, please click on "Copyright Details" on the navigation bar.

 

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Bessie Stringfield—Aunt Bessie to me—

was known as the Motorcycle Queen of Miami to her fans in South Florida back in the 1950s and ’60s. Arguably, to the Miami PD, Bessie with her antics was a bit of a nuisance. And vice versa. She got pulled over so many times on her Harley, that finally she complained to the precinct captain. He doubted that any woman, especially a “Negro,” should be riding a Hog around town. He tested Bessie’s riding skills in a parking lot, she bowled him over with her prowess, and the harassment stopped.

Bessie is vamping here, but in the age of Jim Crow, sometimes she slept on her bike at gas stations when no one would rent her a motel room.
Bessie is vamping here, but in the age of Jim Crow, sometimes she slept on her bike at gas stations when no one would rent her a motel room.
Ann is just vamping. She slept in a few greasy truck-stops during her road trips, but unlike Bessie, Ann never had to sleep overnight on her bike.
Ann is just vamping. She slept in a few greasy truck-stops during her road trips, but unlike Bessie, Ann never had to sleep overnight on her bike.

Bessie was daring and had done a lot outside the norm for African American women—indeed, for all women—before she died in 1993. I discovered that she’d done it mostly from a space usually reserved for men: the saddles of the 27 Harley-Davidson motorcycles she had owned in her lifetime. Bessie lived to be 82 and told me all about her escapades during our friendship in the last three years of her life.

We met in 1990 when Bessie was 79 years old. I was 35 and a novice rider in my native New York City. It’s hard to believe looking back, but America’s biker subculture was still mainly a man’s world. I had a lot to learn from Bessie and I hung on every word spoken to me by this amazing woman. She became my surrogate aunt.

Bessie Stringfield had an aura even in her twilight years. She was the first African American woman known to ride motorcycles around the United States—eight times, she declared—during the pre-Civil Rights decades of the 1930s and 1940s, when racial prejudice was a threat to her safety. Bessie’s favorite method of planning her routes—NOT!—was to toss a penny over a map and ride to wherever it landed. This style of travel was called gypsy touring. She told me how she dodged a few hardballs that Jim Crow flung at her along the way.

Listening to Bessie, I gleaned that she had been a maverick even during the World War II years. She told me how she rode her own Harley for the army as a civilian dispatch rider on the home-front. Bessie said she was the only woman in a unit of six black men. At just five feet tall, Bessie described training rigorously to navigate her motorcycle on almost any terrain. Small wonder that the “little woman” bowled over that police captain.

“The roads must have been hell,” I said, picturing the mud and ruts of the continent’s unpaved roads before the interstates were built. “How many unplanned dismounts did you have?”

Bessie chuckled. “Well I had a few, but mostly the Lord held me up.” Then she proceeded to outline some of her techniques. I learned from her how I—a 105-pound woman at the time—could summon my inner superwoman to lift a fallen motorcycle five times my own weight. (Lower-body strength, women, lower-body strength.)

Ann Florida Keys2
Bess BLUE Boots & Blouse My Pic Improved by Paul(1)_small

 

One of the earliest stories I wrote about Bessie recounted her thrill at riding her Indian Scout around the walls of an old wooden motordrome. Called the Wall of Death at carnivals, a motordrome is a huge wooden barrel. The biker rides up the wall and uses speed, momentum and centrifugal force to keep from crashing to the bottom. With Bessie's "I can do anything" attitude, I could easily picture her doing it.

“Amazing,” I said. “How did you learn to ride the wall?”

“The Man Upstairs taught me,” said Bessie, “and the motorcycle knows what to do. You have to trust it.”

"Yeah, that," I responded. "But you believed in yourself and your skills."

"If you say so," she said simply.

 

After the war on her Harley, Bessie told me she did trick riding on terra firma at motorcycle shows. She described to me how she stood in the saddle and performed other fancy moves on the rolling bike. In the soulful ’60s, Bessie was literally the leader of the pack—presiding over a group of mostly black men in her own motorcycle club that she founded in Miami.

My Aunt Bessie Stringfield was surely unconventional—iconoclastic, in my view. I wondered, Why wasn’t this queen in black or women’s history books? I saw the importance of recording her oral history while there was still time. With her blessing and encouragement, I became the only author to exclusively record the voice and the stories of Bessie Stringfield as told by Bessie herself.

With Bessie’s trust and reliance on my skills and experience as a storyteller of women’s lives, I became her authorized biographer at her request. Further, with our bond of friendship—elder to younger, woman to woman, road-junkie mentor to road-junkie protégé—I became the steward of the nearly lost legacy of Bessie Stringfield. She and I formed a bond that transcended our racial, regional, ethnic and generational differences. It was a rare and beautiful thing.

I listened while this incredible woman looked back for me on the spectrum of her life. My long-form biography of Bessie Stringfield is coupled with my memoir. The biography reveals new material about Bessie from parts of her oral history and our conversations that I have never released before. The memoir looks back on our unusual friendship and how Bessie impacted my own life. It is called African American Queen of the Road—Bessie Stringfield and Me, A Memoir of Race, Friendship, Resilience and the Road.

As some of you know, I’ve written about Bessie before. But this time it’s different. Since Bessie’s passing, it’s taken a quarter-century of accumulated wisdom to gain my deeper insights. Race, friendship, resilience and the road—and our Catholic faith, too—were the pillars that surrounded Bessie Stringfield and me within our friendship and far beyond it. Neither one of us had the structure or support of a nuclear family. We were essentially misfits who took community where we could find it at different times. Even after all these years, whenever I face a challenge—and I’ve faced many—I still ask myself, What would Bessie have told me to do?

Photos are from the collection of Ann Ferrar. May not be used without permission.

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Bessie’s wartime road trips — especially with

her being a black woman in the segregated army—were intriguing to me. As a baby boomer, I have always been keen on the Greatest Generation. My dad was a World War II veteran and my mom was a stenographer for a defense contractor in the 1940s.

I asked, “Aunt Bessie, how did you end up riding your motorcycle during the war? Why didn’t you work in a Rosie the Riveter job?”

A seasoned raconteur, Bessie replied, “Well, they [the army] heard about me. They said I had plenty of nerve and they could use me.”

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Author HearMeRoar Beemer warm or blue1

“They used you for what?” I wanted to know. “What kind of papers did you carry in your saddlebags?”

Coyly: “Whatever I was takin' that's a military secret.”

Riddles were part of Bessie’s modus operandi. She let out a hint of glee whenever she left me to decode her secrets.

In the early 1950s, Bessie bought a house in Opa Locka, a neighborhood in northern Miami. She cruised the streets standing in the saddle of her Harleys and did her trick riding shows at biker events. Locals dubbed her variously as the Negro Motorcycle Queen, the Motorcycle Lady and the Motorcycle Queen of Miami. This woman lived and breathed to ride. Bessie told me how she snuck into a flat-track race, a rough-and-tumble cycle sport not for the faint of heart. “I hid my hair under my helmet so they wouldn’t see I was a girl,” she told me conspiratorially on tape. “I won the race, took off my helmet and tossed my hair. But they didn’t give me the prize money.”

In awe of her moxie and initiative, in my early writings I said Bessie was like a one-woman Civil Rights movement. While she never became a Civil Rights marcher, I concluded that Bessie Stringfield defied both racial and gender barriers in her own singular way.

In the 1960s, Bessie led the men of her Iron Horse Motorcycle Club, even using her home as the clubhouse. Yet when the group disbanded, Bessie was alone again, as she divorced the last of her six husbands, too. She’d agreed to keep the surname of her third husband, Stringfield, at his request, since she had “made it famous.”

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Photos are from the collection of Ann Ferrar. May not be used without permission.

During the first three years of my own

motorcycle road trips—1990 to 1993—often I phoned Bessie from spartan motel rooms. I, too, rode tens of thousands of miles alone, with nothing but the drone of the wind and my engine inside my helmet. We traded stories of her experiences as a black Southern woman on a persnickety Harley in a segregated era, and mine as a white, Brooklyn-born woman, zooming along on a high-tech bike. I rode on paved roads and had my pick of motels and diners. I was alone, but not alone against the world as Bessie had been.

Unlike Bessie, I was never denied lodging, gas, or a meal at a diner. Never did I have to ride my mechanically sound bike on a creepy backroad as the only route available. Never did I have to swerve around beer cans deliberately tossed in my path. And unlike Bessie, I was never stalked by a bigot in a pickup truck who ran me off the road, wrecking my bike and scraping me up.

Bess02c WhiteLinenHelmetFullShotHD1200dpi
Bessie’s first bike was a 1928 Indian Scout. Ann is on a vintage Indian of the period used for motordrome stunt riding at the old wooden Wall of Death, Daytona Bike Week, 1993. Bessie said she rode in a motordrome in her youth. Ann was happy to applaud others who did it!
Bessie’s first bike was a 1928 Indian Scout. Ann is on a vintage Indian of the period used for motordrome stunt riding at the old wooden Wall of Death, Daytona Bike Week, 1993. Bessie said she rode in a motordrome in her youth. Ann was happy to applaud others who did it!

Yet Bessie also had many happy, life-affirming encounters with whites and other ethnic people. She met curious locals and amused white gas station owners, some of whom filled her tanks for free. She told me, “All along the way, wherever I rode, the people was [sic] overwhelmed to see a Negro woman ridin’ a motorcycle.”

Still, Bessie always had to look over her shoulder for Jim Crow. “If you had black skin, you couldn’t get a place to stay,” she said. “I slept with people’s children a lot because no one would rent me a motel room.” Bessie described to me how sometimes, she slept on her bike at gas stations, using her rolled-up jacket as a pillow across the handlebars, while resting her feet on the rear fender.

“Aunt B, you were so alone out there,” I said. “You weren’t afraid?

Downplaying her courage, she replied, “Nobody killed me, thank God.”

From our many intimate, frank conversations, I knew that Bessie considered all of it—the good with the bad—as part of the journey. The woman didn’t waste energy on anger or resentment; besides, she didn’t have the time.

Still, I was astounded by her vulnerability and told her so.

“I didn’t worry about it,” she said. “I knew the Lord would take care of me, and He did.”

End of Preview, Part I

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Photos are from the collection of Ann Ferrar. May not be used without permission.